2021 Ramsay Art Prize Winner an Adelaide Fringe Alum

Published: Fri, May 21 2021
Posted in General, Reviews
2021 Ramsay Art Prize Winner an Adelaide Fringe Alum
Kate with the Eran Svigos Award for Best Visual Art at the 2020 Adelaide Fringe Awards. Photo: Chloe Elizabeth

Kate creates her artistic works in a range of mediums, including metal, mould-making, textiles, print and sound. Her works centre around themes of identity, gender and queer perspectives, and she utilises installations to connect materials with psychological states and behaviours.

In 2019 Kate, alongside other South Australian artists Anna Gore and Sam Gold, was the recipient of the 2020 Adelaide Fringe Artist Fund Grant. This saw her receive an eight-month residency at the George Street Studios in Thebarton where she worked on a collaborative project with the other artists, resulting in Material Girls.

Three artists stand around a large sign of the letter g while smiling at the camera

Kate, Anna Gore and Sam Gold at George Street Studios. Photo: Tony Rosella

Kate went on to win the Eran Svigos Award for Best Visual Art at the 2020 Adelaide Fringe Awards Ceremony for the works she created through the grant. Aptly titled, the award-winning works in Material Girls focussed on the theme of material experimentation and new processes and was loved by both Fringe audiences and Fringe judges alike. This award win came with a cash prize of $2,000 to contribute to Kate’s future work and exhibitions as she developed and refined her career as an exhibiting artist.

We are incredibly proud to have worked with Kate along her artistic journey, and are impressed with how far this imaginative and talented South Australian artist has come within the span of only a few short years.

The Ramsay Art Prize is Australia’s most generous prize for Australian artists under the age of 40 with the winner receiving $100,000. Kate’s impressive, Ramsay-award winning artwork, edges of excess, was inspired by the pendulum which was utilised in her younger years as a method of healing and guidance. According to Kate, this technique became overused and the ‘tool’ began to have negative causation.

You can check out this artwork at the Art Gallery of South Australia here. Congratulations Kate!